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Mountains and Adventure Awaits
Explore New Zealand South Island
mai-moeslund-2lAWK0AnVog-unsplash South Island New Zealand | Travel Park NZ | Activities Hiking Gym Places
tobias-tullius-QTEZfr5xKF8-unsplash South Island New Zealand | Travel Park NZ | Activities Hiking Gym Places
vincent-burkhead-4jS2Ux-THJE-unsplash South Island New Zealand | Travel Park NZ | Activities Hiking Gym Places
jasper-van-der-meij-Xo3uIN_Q1Y0-unsplash South Island New Zealand | Travel Park NZ | Activities Hiking Gym Places
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South Island

The South Island of New Zealand is recognized for its mountains, lakes and glaciers. The Southern Alps, home to 3, 724m high Aoraki Mt. Cook, run along the whole duration of the island. From the south west is Fiordland National Park, with extreme sided Milford Sound. From the north west is the Abel Tasman National Park, famous for its paths and ocean kayaking. Queenstown is famous for adventure sports such as bungee jumping and ski. The South Island, also formally named Te Waipounamu, is the bigger of the two islands of New Zealand in surface area, the other being the smaller, but more populous North Island. 

It's bordered on the north by Cook Strait, on the west by the Tasman Sea, and also to the south and east by the Pacific Ocean. The South Island covers kilometre making it the world's 12th biggest island. It's got a temperate climate. It's got 32 percent more land than North Island, and consequently is nicknamed the mainland of New Zealand, notably by South Island inhabitants, but only 23 percent from New Zealand 4.9 million inhabitants reside there. At the first phases of European settlement of the nation, the South Island had the most of European population and wealth because of the 1860 gold rushes. The North Island population overtook the South from the beginning of the twentieth century, with 56% of people living from the North in 1911, and the drift north of individuals and businesses continued during the century.